HyperVersize - a new trend, which is worth a look

The new collections of the season autumn-winter 2016/2017 from New York and London in a new way decode the concept of oversize, which we used to characterize things of free cut, not emphasizing the figure and looking as if they were large in size. It seems that already this autumn, we will not just wait for an oversight, but a hyper-verse - a fashion for clothes that are not big for you, but for at least five sizes. And in this “exaggeration” of proportions not only youth brands like Puma and MM6 Maison Margiela, but also Victoria Beckham, Marc Jacobs and Calvin Klein are in solidarity. Will gigantic clothes ever become our new fashionable addiction? Proceeding from our winters, where the scale of warming matters, we decided to consider this idea more closely.

Outerwear most often lends itself to hyperbolization in designer collections - you can count the impressions on which the jackets and coats were shown in size, but outerwear, and including hyperoversized, is very common.The central things in the collections of Victoria Beckham and Marc Jacobs were gigantic coats - with a rounded shoulder line, a maxi-length and a loose "careless" cut, and Jacobs also decorated individual coats with fur lining on his shoulders, which gave the things even more volume. By the way, Marc Jacobs doesn’t stop at a coat - in his collection both dresses and sweatshirts, which, it seems, will be great, are also dimensionless. Rihanna, a big fan of sportswear, stands in solidarity with the designer - in her joint collection with PUMA, every second thing is a frank hyperoverserial.

Victoria Beckham, Fall-Winter 2016/2017

Victoria Beckham, Fall-Winter 2016/2017

Dion Lee, Pre-Fall 2016

Dion Lee, Pre-Fall 2016

Marc Jacobs, autumn-winter 2016/2017

Marc Jacobs, autumn-winter 2016/2017

Fenty PUMA by Rihanna, Fall-Winter 2016/2017

Fenty PUMA by Rihanna, Fall-Winter 2016/2017

If the designers do not "spread out in breadth" the silhouette of outerwear, then individual details of the cut are amenable to hyperbolization, and most often these are sleeves. For example, in The Row, with a measure of loose outerwear, the sleeves will inevitably stretch down and completely cover the hands, and at the Beaufille brand, the coat becomes a Pierrot suit with hyper-long sleeves, the shape of which is shortened by shortened trousers.

The Row, Autumn-Winter 2016/2017

The Row, Autumn-Winter 2016/2017

Beaufille, autumn-winter 2016/2017

Beaufille, autumn-winter 2016/2017

Extends to the impossible and cut other familiar items of clothing. For example, Marques'Almeida is a XXL size shirt, which, according to the formula already familiar to us, is worn under a night dress, MM6 Maison Margiela has a strict costume that you seem to lend to the pope.At Calvin Klein Collection, sweaters and culottes that look like dimensionless homewear go wide, while Gabriela Hearst oversizes switches to accessories, and we see a scarf in front of which you can easily wrap in two or three.

Marques'Almeida, autumn-winter 2016/2017

Marques'Almeida, autumn-winter 2016/2017

MM6 Maison Margiela, Pre-Fall 2016

MM6 Maison Margiela, Pre-Fall 2016

Calvin Klein Collection, Pre-Fall 2016

Calvin Klein Collection, Pre-Fall 2016

Gabriela Hearst, Fall-Winter 2016/2017

Gabriela Hearst, Fall-Winter 2016/2017

History repeats itself in the men's collections of autumn-winter 2016/2017. For example, in Raf Simons, every thing is decidedly dimensionless, whether it be at least military-style jackets, which in terms of size resemble polar down-padded coats, though strict coats in an English cage, even sports-style sweaters with sleeves that (no kidding!) Go exactly up to the knees. Briton J. W. Anderson’s men's collection is full of square men's jackets with hallucinogenic prints and long cardigans a la Kanye West with holes and stretched sleeves. And the German-Persian designer Boris Bidjan Saberi in general presented the best, in our opinion, uniform for Siberian low temperatures - a double sheepskin coat in an eerily gothic style.